Walking Rain

I started this piece last year or so. It’s a wet spring day in NYC. I had spent the day, by myself, in the city. This particular scene occurred after I walked across the Pershing Square covered street bridge on E 42nd and turned around to admire the cafe I had just left.

I spent about an hour slowly drinking a cup of tea, people watching and reading a book I acquired from the MMA (the MET) earlier that day.

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Pushing beyond 

This past spring I traveled with my companion, photographer S. Smith, throughout Northern England. We spent a considerable amount of time out in the countryside and driving down iconic one lane roads through small villages. One experience that has profoundly affected me as an artist is to visually experience seeing greens & blues differently. 

Allow me to fill in some lesser known facts about me. 

First, I have MS and as a result a complete visual split. That allows me to see in a panoramic view. It’s a trip for sure. 

Second, I have diminished depth perception due to the lack of binocular vision.

 Finally, I have tritanomaly color blindness. I have functionally limited blue cone cells. Blue appears greener and yellow and red are hard to distinguish from pink. Apparently Tritanomaly is extremely rare. 
Now let’s imagine hiking through the countryside of Northern England and the Moors National Forest experiencing a different light from sun and seeing green in a whole new way. Now imagine standing on the shores of the North Sea and seeing blue in a different way. 

It’s been almost 6 months since our trip and I’m slowly exploring the many photos taken for reference while painting. I’ve done a seascape and a land/sea-scape so far. I’m exploring with both oils and acrylics as well as grayscale toning the canvas first then applying color. 

I am pushing beyond my limited physical senses and more in a instinctive one as well. Beyond seeing color, beyond visual form and express a new truth within the experience. 

Plans are underway now for spending time drawing & painting in the SW United States. I look forward to spending time at Ghost Ranch &  experiencing Georgia O’Keeffe’s studio. Also, plans are coming together for a return to Northern England & Scotland. Exploring the beautiful landscapes, architecture & art in France is around the corner too. 
Stay on the Awiya side of Life my Creatives! 

“Whitby Beach” 

30” x 60” oil on stretched canvas 

I spent a considerable amount of time on this large piece. After more than 50 hours, numerous brushes & different shapes of painting knives the vibrancy and inviting feel of this piece calls you to the shores of the North Sea. 

This piece is available for sale. $2,000

Poppies at the Train Station 




Location: Goathland, England aka Hogwarts Station 

Photographer: Lou Ewers 

One of the stops on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway is to a small village named Goathland. Hidden amongst the beautiful landscape of the Moors National Park. This little village of just over 400 is also known as Hogsmeade Railway Station as seen in Harry Potter Movies. 

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Space that time built

 

While planning for my trip to the UK, I spent a considerable amount of time deciding what I wanted to accomplish while there. One of the ideas that kept popping up, was that of old rock walls. Not necessarily the defensive walls around an old castle or the strategic military historical sites but rather, the space that time built. The walls that I am referring to are the ones that were built as field boundaries by farmers.

I am fascinated by the idea of these drystone walls. The research that I’ve done has revealed that most if not all of these walls could contain stones and be as old as the tradition themselves. The art and tradition of constructing these drystone walls date back as far as the iron age. Further my ponderings as I photographed old drystone walls and fields along the countryside, I found myself thinking that even though the activities on one side of the wall was grazing sheep and cows, so too was the other farmer, on the other side of the wall. However, it was indeed the space that was defined by the drystones walls. As if the partition designs the walls created throughout the land defined the character of the area.

The same could be said for the wooden boundaries created by the stretcher bars of the artist’s canvas. Given, it’s not as beautiful as the natural landscape of the English countryside. However, it is also a space that time built and hopefully the resulting art is as timeless and appreciated as the ancient drystone walls.

It is my hope over the coming year to completed a series of paintings from my experiences and photographs from my time exploring in the UK.

Location: North Yorkshire Moors National Park

Photographer: Lou Ewers

Church in the Dales


Location: North Yorkshire Dales, England 

Photographer: Lou Ewers