All posts by Awiya Side of Life

About Awiya Side of Life

American Artist Louise Ewers explores the boundaries of painting in various pigment mediums. Leaning heavily towards Impressionism, Louise pushes beyond the boundaries of established painting practices towards Awiya. Awiya, meaning “light moving through” or creativity is a unique creative process which encompasses contemplation, intuition and design principles rarely used together. Movement of light. Passion for life. Reverence for the creative process of expression. Louise studied fine art at Minneapolis College of Art & Design and Bellevue University and continued to be a self-taught artist. Louise was featured as an emerging American artist in the BU Bellwether Magazine June 2016. Filtering life through Multiple Sclerosis, Louise explores her ever changing visual perceptions as she creates through light and form. When Louise is not being a very busy and sought after Painter, she can be found drawing, painting, or gently creating in her private life. Louise asks you to join her on a unique journey through creativity and the process of bringing your vision to canvas.

Pushing beyond 

This past spring I traveled with my companion, photographer S. Smith, throughout Northern England. We spent a considerable amount of time out in the countryside and driving down iconic one lane roads through small villages. One experience that has profoundly affected me as an artist is to visually experience seeing greens & blues differently. 

Allow me to fill in some lesser known facts about me. 

First, I have MS and as a result a complete visual split. That allows me to see in a panoramic view. It’s a trip for sure. 

Second, I have diminished depth perception due to the lack of binocular vision.

 Finally, I have tritanomaly color blindness. I have functionally limited blue cone cells. Blue appears greener and yellow and red are hard to distinguish from pink. Apparently Tritanomaly is extremely rare. 
Now let’s imagine hiking through the countryside of Northern England and the Moors National Forest experiencing a different light from sun and seeing green in a whole new way. Now imagine standing on the shores of the North Sea and seeing blue in a different way. 

It’s been almost 6 months since our trip and I’m slowly exploring the many photos taken for reference while painting. I’ve done a seascape and a land/sea-scape so far. I’m exploring with both oils and acrylics as well as grayscale toning the canvas first then applying color. 

I am pushing beyond my limited physical senses and more in a instinctive one as well. Beyond seeing color, beyond visual form and express a new truth within the experience. 

Plans are underway now for spending time drawing & painting in the SW United States. I look forward to spending time at Ghost Ranch &  experiencing Georgia O’Keeffe’s studio. Also, plans are coming together for a return to Northern England & Scotland. Exploring the beautiful landscapes, architecture & art in France is around the corner too. 
Stay on the Awiya side of Life my Creatives! 

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“Whitby Beach” 

30” x 60” oil on stretched canvas 

I spent a considerable amount of time on this large piece. After more than 50 hours, numerous brushes & different shapes of painting knives the vibrancy and inviting feel of this piece calls you to the shores of the North Sea. 

This piece is available for sale. $2,000

Poppies at the Train Station 




Location: Goathland, England aka Hogwarts Station 

Photographer: Lou Ewers 

One of the stops on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway is to a small village named Goathland. Hidden amongst the beautiful landscape of the Moors National Park. This little village of just over 400 is also known as Hogsmeade Railway Station as seen in Harry Potter Movies. 

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Space that time built

 

While planning for my trip to the UK, I spent a considerable amount of time deciding what I wanted to accomplish while there. One of the ideas that kept popping up, was that of old rock walls. Not necessarily the defensive walls around an old castle or the strategic military historical sites but rather, the space that time built. The walls that I am referring to are the ones that were built as field boundaries by farmers.

I am fascinated by the idea of these drystone walls. The research that I’ve done has revealed that most if not all of these walls could contain stones and be as old as the tradition themselves. The art and tradition of constructing these drystone walls date back as far as the iron age. Further my ponderings as I photographed old drystone walls and fields along the countryside, I found myself thinking that even though the activities on one side of the wall was grazing sheep and cows, so too was the other farmer, on the other side of the wall. However, it was indeed the space that was defined by the drystones walls. As if the partition designs the walls created throughout the land defined the character of the area.

The same could be said for the wooden boundaries created by the stretcher bars of the artist’s canvas. Given, it’s not as beautiful as the natural landscape of the English countryside. However, it is also a space that time built and hopefully the resulting art is as timeless and appreciated as the ancient drystone walls.

It is my hope over the coming year to completed a series of paintings from my experiences and photographs from my time exploring in the UK.

Location: North Yorkshire Moors National Park

Photographer: Lou Ewers

Church in the Dales


Location: North Yorkshire Dales, England 

Photographer: Lou Ewers 

Exploring color and form

     Now that I’ve had a chance to go through the majority of my photos from my U.K. Trip I’m settling in to exploring the images in greater depth.  I’ve seen some artist grab a reference photo and as if in robot mode paint the image in expected color combination and with a boring palette. The end result may be “technically” in vogue and aesthetically pleasing but does it have passion? Life? Awiya? 

     As I explore this reference photo of the North Sea I am flooded with memories of how the cool and moist wind felt on my skin. The brilliance of color and how different the light bathed everything. The sea was a blue grey color I’ve never seen in real life. As I explored the North Sea from the beach, on a boat and walking along the peer at different times of day, the suns light changed the appearance of the sea from blue-grey to light pale blue, silver, and liquid gold floating on a silver surface. 

     Living in Nebraska, relatively in the middle of the country, I have grown accustomed to the orange, red and dark yellow sunsets. The coloring of Midwest light from the dust, pollution, and heat within the atmosphere of a heavy agricultural state. 

     I will enjoy every moment as I explore this reference photo, unedited, edited and diving deep into my memory and allow Awiya to flow through me as I prepare for a series of North Sea paintings. 

Stay on the Awiya Side of Life my Creatives.