Tag Archives: creative

Poppies at the Train Station 




Location: Goathland, England aka Hogwarts Station 

Photographer: Lou Ewers 

One of the stops on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway is to a small village named Goathland. Hidden amongst the beautiful landscape of the Moors National Park. This little village of just over 400 is also known as Hogsmeade Railway Station as seen in Harry Potter Movies. 

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Church in the Dales


Location: North Yorkshire Dales, England 

Photographer: Lou Ewers 

Exploring color and form

     Now that I’ve had a chance to go through the majority of my photos from my U.K. Trip I’m settling in to exploring the images in greater depth.  I’ve seen some artist grab a reference photo and as if in robot mode paint the image in expected color combination and with a boring palette. The end result may be “technically” in vogue and aesthetically pleasing but does it have passion? Life? Awiya? 

     As I explore this reference photo of the North Sea I am flooded with memories of how the cool and moist wind felt on my skin. The brilliance of color and how different the light bathed everything. The sea was a blue grey color I’ve never seen in real life. As I explored the North Sea from the beach, on a boat and walking along the peer at different times of day, the suns light changed the appearance of the sea from blue-grey to light pale blue, silver, and liquid gold floating on a silver surface. 

     Living in Nebraska, relatively in the middle of the country, I have grown accustomed to the orange, red and dark yellow sunsets. The coloring of Midwest light from the dust, pollution, and heat within the atmosphere of a heavy agricultural state. 

     I will enjoy every moment as I explore this reference photo, unedited, edited and diving deep into my memory and allow Awiya to flow through me as I prepare for a series of North Sea paintings. 

Stay on the Awiya Side of Life my Creatives. 

Pinch me

Where do I begin? Perhaps a pinch in the side would wake me up from this beautiful dream. As  you can probably tell, I have returned from my grand adventure to the U.K. and am going through the many photos. I started to post some of them but many more that probably won’t grace the pages here. 

This particular selfie I took at a moment of pure disbelief that I was standing in gallery halls of the National Gallery in London. 


I discovered the stunning work of Joseph Mallord William Turner. This painting is titled “Rain, Steam and Speed -The Great Western Railroad” 1844  

This painting is visually breathtaking & emotionally provacative. Standing in front of this painting and experiencing the surrounding atmosphere of the museum and the steady traffic of viewers that tranversed along from painting to painting added a sense of symbiotic flow which I found hypnotic. 

Stay tuned my creatives, there is more to come and as I process all the experiences from my journey I will be sure to share. 

As a side note, all my photos were taken on a iPhone 7 plus. 

Hello My Creatives! Delighted Spring!

 

Winter has faded away into the distant crevasses of our memories and summer is almost shining strong.

 

Spiraling updates to get you back into the cycle of compassion again.

 

I finished another year of college classes and am ready for a summer off to paint.

My mother died this past November and now she joins my father who died 23 years ago. Jes had his cervical discectomy with fusion on c5-c6 April 2nd and continues to recuperate.  It is his hope to be back in front of his easel in the coming months. We rescued a 5week old Silver Pinsche puppy. He is now 6 months old and his name is Lego.

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The paintings from The Light of Nebraska are ready for showing. However, over the winter months, our local library experienced devastating water damage from broken water pipes in the ceiling. They are currently serving the public on a limited basis from another location. Now I am in search of another venue for a showing and then distribution of the paintings to the corresponding county libraries. As soon as arrangements have been made, I will make a formal announcement with all the details and pictures.

 

Stay tuned my Creatives for refreshing updates on our website at Ewers Fine Art and new pieces. Currently select pieces are available for purchase now on our site.  Also available are canvas and paper prints of our entire collection through Fine Art America-Lou and Fine Art America- Jes

 

Rolling along through the scenery

 

 

What should I paint next?

I have a few picture choices from Douglas County Nebraska. Keeping the Light of Nebraska project rolling along!

Hey if you want to become part of this project and help out…. I’m always in need of paint brushes. Check out our supply wish list for this project.

http://www.dickblick.com/lists/wishlist/B2XB460GBD72F/publicview/

Thanks you for your gifts! 🙂

Leaving some love

Just leaving some love for the Awiya project and my fellow artisans, Lou and Jes Ewers! Our fundraiser was a success in large part to loving, creatives such as them! Many thanks and much love from our little family….Cory, Crystal and Chloe Vandevoorde

It’s Just A Number

Don’t say you don’t have enough time. You have exactly the same number of hours per day that were given to Helen Keller, Pasteur, Michaelangelo, Mother Teresea, Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Jefferson, and Albert Einstein.” –Life’s Little Instruction Book

Artistic Thread

Guest Blogger Michelle Mullin

“When we had moved back to Nebraska, after my Air Force time stationed in Tucson, I eventually worked at Nebraska Furniture Mart. There was an elderly lady who worked at the central info desk who I used to talk to all the time. Vivian, with bright red hair and twinkling eyes. One day at lunch, she was watching me make something and remarked that she saw very few young people these days who could crochet, or would take the time to make
things like that. Then I found out that she knew how to make tatted lace! I knew what that was because I used to make some crochet patterns I found in old Workbasket magazines, and I had seen some shuttle tatting patterns there. But no matter how I begged and pleaded, she wouldn’t agree to teach me. She said she just didn’t have the patience, but finally she told me she’d ask her husband to show me… Apparently, he was the one who’d taught her in the first place!

Such a nice old gentleman, Wendell must have been close to eighty…and when the weather was bad he still would drive her to work and wait all day to take her home safely. One of those days, during my lunch hour, he taught me to tatt. He had learned to tatt from his father, who’d been a fisherman in Canada, and they used it to make nets. Sewing, embroidery, knitting, crochet, tatting; in his day and age they weren’t only for women. Obviously, there wasn’t tv, and most people still had to make their clothes. If you wanted to have something nice, you needed to make it, and if you were bored, there was always something that needed made or mended. I was so grateful he thought I was worthy of the time.The only thing he asked of me in return was that some time in my life, I had to teach at least one other person to tatt. I promised him I would, and I also gave him my first tatted doily.


                                                                                                                                                                                                    Thread Art by  Michelle Mullin

Eventually, after having a string of jobs that each worked out worse than the last, I started my own small business teaching crochet and tatting classes through Hobby Lobby… and one of the times I was sitting there by the door handing out my fliers, in walked Vivian and Wendell! I was so happy to be able to tell him that I had lost count of how many people I’d taught to tatt by then. Since then, I’ve taught crocheting and tatting at various times thru Michaels, and even the Adult Continuing Education dept. at Metro Community College.

I volunteered at the elementary school my daughters were attending for Pre-K to teach small numbers of sixth graders to crochet as a reward. Twice a week for an hour we’d take a table in the library and work there. There was a girl who the librarian was tactless enough to comment that she doubted would ever finish anything… I made sure she darn well did. She crocheted a decorative scarf for her grandmother which she even went so far as to finish off with beaded fringe. So there! I took her picture wearing it and I still have it. Never assume what a kid can’t do.

                                                                                                                                                                                                Holiday Ornament by Michelle Mullin

One other little girl there really touched me, because she was just so determined. The first project she made after learning chains and starting a small potholder, was a baby blanket for the little brother who was coming soon. And I don’t mean a little cutesy postage stamp sized baby blankie, no… she made a baby blue and ivory striped afghan big enough for a single bed. One day as she worked I was so tickled when she told me, “You know what Mrs.Mullin, crochet is all about math isn’t it?” Yes, Karla, it is… wasn’t that sneaky of me?

Next, she brought in a scarf someone had begun in shell stitch which she wanted to finish for her little sister. After that, she wanted to make a purse! She’d never had one, and she wanted to make one for herself. 3D crochet is quite a leap from just learning to do it flat… but we started one, using the fuzzy eyelash yarn that’s so popular, but a royal pain to work with. That was what she wanted, and she was determined to make it.

was impressed, she did a fantastic job. She crocheted around some hoop handles, and did gradual increases and decreases of stitches to form the shape – no pattern, simply by how it looked! – and then we sewed a liner in it. But before she finished it, she told me that she wasn’t going to get to keep it, her family was going to visit her Grandmother in Mexico, and she was told to give it to her as a gift. It never occurred to her to object, although she really had wanted to keep it and I didn’t say anything, but I almost cried and the minute I was out of her hearing I said some unfriendly things about her elders under my breath. It did seem unfair to me, but I’ve since come to understand that in her family, it was considered an honor.

Her counselor (who taught me to knit, BTW) and I decided, however, that would not stand. We got her the stuff to make another one, and this time, instead of making it from scraps, she got to pick the color. It ended up the pinkest, fuzziest purse I will probably ever see…and I was secretly thrilled because probably no one would want one that pink but her. She told me later that there were members of her family who had begun to ask her to make them one, and I was so proud that she remembered what I’d taught her about what to charge and how to conduct her small business. In a family where her older siblings were off doing their own thing and she was the one to watch the smaller ones than her, she’d developed a useful skill that got her respect.

We barely had time at the end of the year for me to quickly teach her granny squares and give her a big bag of yarn scraps to use over the summer to work on a blanket. I thought I’d probably never hear from her again, but the beginning of the next year, she called me at home to let me know she’d finished it. At the start, she didn’t think her family would be willing to spend money on yarn for her to learn… but by the end of the year, they took her to the craft store and got her what she asked for.

I create things; I am an artist with thread!”